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Recommendations for how to grow a small amount of money (£300-1000 / $370-$1240) starting • Why would an employer need to know the starting and current value of your stock holdings? I feel that my holding amounts are not their business. This makes me very uncomfortable.

Unreadit/Personal Finance
Recommendations for how to grow a small amount of money (£300-1000 / $370-$1240) starting r/passive_income • u/sweetpotatofamily share

I have a little bit of extra money sitting in a savings account and will have a bit of a higher income for the next month or two. I'd love any recommendations on how to make the most of and grow this small amount.

Really depends on the time frame that you won't need that money liquid. Not too many choices for that amount if it's a short period of time. You could invest it in the highest interest CDs you can find (Certificate of Deposit) which will not net you much, but more than if it just sits in a low interest savings account. Additionally if you have a high risk tolerance you could try investing in a startup or newer business. Finally, you could always leave it in a high interest savings account or dump it into an index fund for a bit.

u/Jrollz93
Why would an employer need to know the starting and current value of your stock holdings? I feel that my holding amounts are not their business. This makes me very uncomfortable. r/personalfinance • u/EliteAlmondMilk share

So I'm up for a job at a casino in CA (owned by a native tribal authority or some such) and look, I get the need for them to make sure that you don't have conflicts of interest / investments in a competitor.

I've worked in IT at a tribal casino, and this type of thing is fairly common. It not the exact same as far as needing to know stock holdings, but they dig very far into your debts, credit, investments, etc. As well as do extensive background checks. This is all to ensure you are not a huge risk to employ. If you're doing okay on your investments, you don't have outrageous outstanding debt, and your salary is good compared to your debt, you probably won't be as inclined to steal from them.

I'd assume this is all being done by a licensing agency? (ie, OPG, office of public gaming). Usually, you'll have to get a gaming license to work for a casino, and the licensing authority is the one that requires all of the extra information to issue you a license.

Honestly, it's typical, but annoying. Welcome to tribal life, buddy. Where they only need 20% of the information they ask for, and they'll probably lose all of it in a week anyway.

u/Julius__PleaseHer
Got a job & no longer homeless! Looking for some help with budgeting. r/personalfinance • u/rice_happy share

updated budget: https://i.imgur.com/4cOIcn8.png

  • I was never taught anything about money so I'm just looking for advice, mainly: Am I forgetting anything & are there any problems with my plan.
Every $1 spent on a primary home in 1989 made the buyer $17 less wealthy today. An original study. r/financialindependence • u/jerschneid share
FI people who got "everything covered", what financial issues propped up that you never expected? r/financialindependence • u/RationalIdiot share

For me the big thing is taking care of sick parents. Once that is taken care of i feel like i can pursue FI.

Divorce. That really changed the plan.

u/operrepo

Deaths and funerals are surprisingly expensive. Especially if you have to travel for them.

Aged care can be expensive for yourself or for parents. Especially for parents who have exhausted their own assets.

Children can come with unexpected expenses too. Typically people plan well up to 18, or even some way into college. But big expenses can come after that. Help with a house deposit. Changing degrees half way through school. Weddings. Travel if they decide to set up shop somewhere distant from you.

In short, you have your own finances sorted. But what about everyone else around you that you care about?

u/KiwasiGames
Inherited A Fortune Of Property In France, And I Need Advice r/FinancialPlanning • u/Marthorax share

Hi, Reddit. I need help.

How to handle unexpected life events debtdiscipline.com • r/FinancialPlanning • u/techbuddy70 share
After payroll provider collapses, banks drain employee accounts r/personalfinance • u/kob66 share

MyPayRollHR, a payroll processing provider with about 4,000 small to mid-sized business customers, suddenly closed late last week.


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